Author Profile - Julian Adomako-Gyimah


Julian is an alum of Presby Boys Secondary School, Legon. He holds a B.A. in Business Studies at the Kensington College of Business, London, a Diploma in Journalism at the Writers Bureau College of Journalism, Manchester, UK, Executive Diplomas in Strategic Management and Management, a Diploma in Management Studies and an Executive MBA at the Huddersfield University, UK.

He has worked in several management positions in the UK and Africa and wants to see Africans do a lot more for themselves rather than relying on the IMF and other donor agencies by developing their human capital. He speaks three languages with a rudimentary knowledge of German and has traveled extensively around the globe spreading his poetry messages and helping out with business solutions.

Julian is also the proud author of two bestsellers, namely Smile Africa and Recall, which are both available on,,, and in major retail outlets around the globe.

Julian is a co-founder of One Ghana, One Voice.

Three Questions with Julian Adomako-Gyimah:

1. "The deer never stops running" is such a striking line - it almost acts as a hinge on which the whole poem pivots. What brought this image to your mind during the writing process?

Africa is my mother and nurtured me right from the day I was born till today. It fed me, gave me water, saved me from the roaring lions in our midst, saved me from the wolves and evil politicians such as Botha the Mosquito and mavericks such as Iddi Amin. It has fought through thin and thick just to make lives of her kids better but to no avail. It has tried on several occasions to unite her people but anytime she tries to do that, the imperialists strike and cause wars, hunger and massive hatred and this is where the deer never stops running. Nkrumah would have loved to see a United Africa because United we stand and divided we fall. The western powers want to see Africa as it is and not as a United Front as it is easier from them to manipulate us in our current state. Europeans formed the EU and the US formed the USA. there is also the ASEAN but Africa has not been able to unite till date. This is where the deer never stops running comes to play... it means that we are just not helping ourselves and the figurative deer will not stop running to enable us get a catch until we redefine our identity. Who cares about Africa's plight? We need to solve our own problems as Africans because our destiny is in our hands.

Why did I choose the deer in particular? The deer as we all know is a very symbolic creature in Africa. In Ghana for example, the deer is of much significance to the Efutu's and they go hunting for the deer during their annual "akwambo" festival so I literally decided to use the deer in the context to show how Europeans, Americans, Asians, etc. have been able to turn their economies around thus coming home with a deer whilst we have been hunting for ages without success. On the very day we get close, such as the last AU summit, where I expected African Unity to be clinched, the deer instead kept running. The deer never stops running thus making it difficult for us to get to our destination. In simple words, I had the picture of the various factions in Winneba chasing the deer and not being able to make a catch in mind. Poetry in Motion!

2. How important is repetition in your poetry? What effects do you hope for it to produce in the reader?

Repetition is very important as it is usually a symbol of emphasis on a particular concern and this is something I use with the view that if the reader misses the point at the first reading, they can spot it again and reconnect. Poetry is a language that is best described by the Poet and that is why I believe there isn't one defined way of writing poetry. Did you not see how chauvinism is of great concern to me in the poem that featured repetitions and did it not tell you to see that quality as unacceptable and bad? That is the whole essence of repetitions in my poems.

3. You travel extensively for business both in Africa and in Europe. Has this altered in any way the themes you've chosen to write about? If so, how?

Certainly, and it is really helping my writing style to a great extent. I currently blend my English style with a self-designed African style to get a unique and rich blend of poetry that allows the reader to visualise what they read in their minds eye. In Europe, I address mostly injustices such as racism and unequal opportunities when it comes to recruitments. It is a different theme when I come to Africa where I mostly address issues such as female circumcision, political thefts, etc. This year, my experiences around the world is teaching me to speak for the voiceless so my poetry might take a different and a more radical turn. We as poets were born to liberate the masses who have no voice so I am responding to that call for this year.

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